La souveraineté incontestable du Viet Nam sur les iles paracel

Dernier ajout : 24 mai 2013.

http://www.seasfoundation.org/articles/other-sources/864-the-indisputable-sovereignty-of-viet-nam-over-the-paracel-islands
Thứ ba, 05 Tháng 4 2011 16:42

PNG - 117.1 ko

The Indisputable Sovereignty of Viet Nam over the Paracel Islands

Published online on January 30th, 2011, by the National Committee for Border Affairs
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Socialist Republic of Viet Nam

* The original article in Vietnamese can be found at : http://www.biengioilanhtho.gov.vn/Media/bbg/News/Archives/vie/chu%20quyen%20tren%202%20quan%20dao%20Hoang%20Sa%20-%20Truong%20sa.pdf

Translated by Nguyễn Trịnh Đôn

Editorial notes : On January 19, 2011, the Information Office of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China published a “facts-and-figures” article on the China’s seizure of the Viet Nam’s Paracel Islands. The article wrote “On January 19, 1974, our (Chinese) armed forces and people on the Xisha Islands successfully conducted a counter-attack for the purpose of self-defence and sovereignty protection against the South Vietnamese puppet armed forces, which had been continuously violating our territorial waters and airspace, occupying our islands, and killing and injuring our fishermen.”
To follow up the story with more information, the Southeast Asian Sea Research Foundation (Quỹ nghiên cứu Biển Đông) presents below an essay by the National Committee for Border Affairs of Viet Nam’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs that uses historical and legal evidence to argue that Viet Nam has indisputable sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands (which are referred to as “Hoàng Sa” and “Trường Sa”, respectively, by Vietnamese).

The Paracel (Hoàng Sa) and the Spratly (Trường Sa) Islands are two archipelagos offshore Viet Nam. The closest point of the Paracel Islands is 120 nautical miles east of the City of Đà Nẵng and Ré Island, a coastal island of Viet Nam, while the closest point of the Spratly Islands is 250 nautical miles to the east of Cam Ranh Bay.

In the early days, with only vague information about the Paracel and the Spratly Islands, navigators only knew that there was a large area of submerged cays dangerous for watercrafts in the middle of the South China Sea, referred to as “the East Sea” (Biển Đông) by Vietnamese. Ancient Vietnamese documents indicate this area with various names, including “Bãi Cát Vàng” (English : Golden Sandbank), “Hoàng Sa” (Hán-Nôm : 黃沙 ; English : Golden Sand) , “Vạn Lý Hoàng Sa” (Hán-Nôm : 萬里黃沙 ; English : Ten-Thousand-Dặm Golden Sand) , “Đại Trường Sa” (Hán-Nôm : 大長沙 ; English : Grand Long Sand), or “Vạn Lý Trường Sa” (Hán-Nôm : 萬里長沙 ; English : Ten-Thousand-Dặm Long Sand).

Most of the nautical maps made by Western navigators from the 16th to the 18th centuries depict the Paracel and the Spratly Islands as a single archipelago and name it “Pracel”, “Parcel”, or “Paracels” . Later progress in science and navigation allowed the differentiation between the two archipelagos. It was not until about two hundred years ago (1787-1788) that the Paracel Islands were located clearly and accurately as they are known today. This work of locating the Paracel Islands by the Kergariou-Locmaria survey mission helped distinguish the archipelago from the Spratly Islands in the south.

All of the aforementioned maps depict Pracel (including both the Paracel and the Spratly Islands) as an area in the middle of the South China Sea to the east of mainland Viet Nam and located further offshore compared to Viet Nam’s coastal islands. The two archipelagos indicated as the “Paracel” and the “Spratly” (or “Spratley”) Islands in current international nautical maps are indeed those that are called as “Hoàng Sa” and “Trường Sa”, respectively, by Vietnamese people.

Figure 1. A 16th-century Portuguese nautical map depicting the Paracel and the Spratly Islands as a single archipelago located to the east of Viet Nam’s mainland.

Historical Sovereignty of Viet Nam over The Paracel and The Spratly Islands
The Vietnamese people have long known the Paracel and the Spratly Islands, and Viet Nam has occupied and exercised its sovereignty over the two archipelagos in a continuous and peaceful manner.

Several ancient geography books and maps in Viet Nam clearly indicate that “Bãi Cát Vàng”, also known under various names such as “Hoàng Sa”, “Vạn Lý Hoàng Sa”, “Đại Trường Sa”, or “Vạn Lý Trường Sa”, has long been included within the territory of Viet Nam.
Toản tập Thiên Nam tứ chí lộ đồ thư (Hán-Nôm : 纂集天南四至路圖書 ; English : “The Handbook of the South’s Road Map”), compiled in the 17th century by Đỗ Bá Công Đạo, clearly noted in the maps of Quảng Ngãi Prefecture in Quảng Nam that “there was a long sandbank in the middle of the sea that is called Bãi Cát Vàng”, and that “during the last month of every winter, the Nguyễn rulers send eighteen boats there to collect goods, mainly jewelries, money, guns, and ammunition”.

Figure 2. Scanned image of a page of Toản tập Thiên Nam tứ chí lộ đồ thư (纂集天南四至路图書)

In the 1774 map of Đàng Trong (Southern Viet Nam) called Giáp Ngọ niên bình Nam đồ (Hán-Nôm : 甲午年平南圖 ; English : The Map for the Pacification of the South in the Giáp Ngọ Year) , made by Đoan quận công (Hán-Nôm : 端郡公 ; English : Duke of the Đoan County) Bùi Thế Đạt, Bãi Cát Vàng is also indicated as a part of Viet Nam’s territory.

During his assignment in Southern Viet Nam, the scholar Lê Quý Đôn (Hán-Nôm : 黎貴惇) (1726–1784) compiled the 1776 Phủ biên tạp lục (Hán-Nôm : 撫邊雜錄 ; English : Miscellany on the Pacification at the Frontier) on the history, geography, and administration of Southern Viet Nam under the Nguyễn lords (1558-1775). In this work, Lê Quý Đôn described that Đại Trường Sa (including the Paracel and the Spratly Islands) was under the jurisdiction of Quảng Ngãi Prefecture.

Figure 3. Scanned images of the pages describing the Paracel and the Spratly Islands in Phủ biên tạp lục (撫邊雜錄)

“An Vĩnh Commune (xã), Bình Sơn District (huyện), Quảng Ngãi Prefecture (phủ) has a mountain outside its seaport. This 30-dặm wide mountain is called Ré Island (cù lao). It takes four watches (canh) to reach the island, on which there is a ward (phường) named Tứ Chính with beans-growing inhabitants. Further offshore are the Đại Trường Sa Islands, where there are plenty of sea products and other goods. It takes Hoàng Sa Flotilla, founded to collect those products and goods, three full days to reach the islands, which are near Bắc Hải.”

“Bình Sơn District of Quảng Ngãi Prefecture includes the coastal commune of An Vĩnh. Offshore to the northeast of An Vĩnh are many islands and approximately 130 mountains separated by waters which can take from few watches to few days to travel across. Streams of fresh water can be found on these mountains. Within the islands is a 30-dặm long, flat and wide golden sand bank, on which the water is so transparent that one can see through. The islands are rich in swift nests, and there are hundreds or thousands of other kinds of birds ; they alight around instead of avoiding humans. There are many curios on the sandbank. Among the volutes (ốc vân) are the Indian volutes (ốc tai voi). An Indian volute here can be as big as a mat ; on their ventral side are opaque beads, different from pearls, that are as big as fingertips ; their shell can be carved to make identification badges (tấm bài) or calcinated to provide lime for house construction. There are also conches (ốc xà cừ) that can be used for furniture inlay, and Babylon shells (ốc hương). All snails here can be salted for food. The sea turtles are oversized. There is a sea soft-shell turtle called “hải ba” or “trắng bông”, similar to but smaller than the normal hawksbill sea turtles ; their thin shell can be used for furniture inlay, and their thumb-sized eggs can be salted for food. There is a kind of sea cucumbers called “đột đột”, normally seen when swimming about the shore ; they can be used as food after lime treatment, gut removal and drying. Before serving đột đột, one should process it with freshwater crab extract and scrape all the dirt off. It will be better if cooked with shrimps and pork.

Foreign boats often take refuge in these islands to avoid storms. The Nguyễn rulers have established Hoàng Sa Flotilla with seventy sailors selected from An Vĩnh Commune on a rotation basis. Selected sailors receive their order in the Third Month of every year, bring with them sufficient food for six months, and sail on five small fishing boats for three full days to reach the islands. Once settled down on the islands, they are free to catch as many birds and fish as they like. They collect goods from boats passing by, such as sabers, jewelries, money, porcelain rings, and fur ; they also collect plenty of sea turtle shells, sea cucumbers, and volute shells. The sailors return to mainland in the Eighth Month through Eo Seaport. On their return trip, they first sail to Phú Xuân Citadel, where the goods that they have collected shall be submitted to be measured and classified ; they can then take their parts of volutes, sea turtles, and sea cucumbers for their own trading businesses, and receive licenses before going home. The amount of collected materials varies ; sometimes, the sailors could not collect anything at all. I have personally checked the notebook of the former flotilla captain Thuyên Đức Hầu, which recorded the amount of collected goods : 30 scoops of silver in the year of Nhâm Ngọ (Hán-Nôm : 壬午 ; i.e. 1762), 5,100 catties (cân) of tin in the year of Giáp Thân (甲申 ; i.e. 1764), 126 scoops of silver in the year of Ất Dậu (乙酉 ; i.e. 1765), a few sea turtle shells each year from the year of Kỷ Sửu (己丑 ; i.e. 1769) to the year of Quý Tỵ (癸巳 ; i.e. 1773). There were also years when only cubic tin, porcelain bowls, and two copper guns were collected.
The Nguyễn rulers also established Bắc Hải Flotilla without a fixed number of sailors, selected from Tứ Chính Village in Bình Thuận or from Cảnh Dương Commune. Sailors are selected on a voluntary basis. Those who volunteer to join the Flotilla will be exempted from poll tax, patrol and transportation fees. These sailors travel in small fishing boats to Bắc Hải, Côn Lôn Island, and other islands in Hà Tiên area, collecting goods from ships, and sea products such as turtles, abalones, and sea cucumbers. Bắc Hải Flotilla is under the command of Hoàng Sa Flotilla. The collected items are mostly sea products and rarely include jewelries.”

Among those documents that have been preserved until today is the following order dated 1786 made by Lord Superior (Thượng tướng công) :
“Hereby command Hội Đức Hầu, captain of Hoàng Sa Flotilla, to lead four fishing boats to sail directly towards Hoàng Sa and other islands on the sea, to collect jewelries, copper items, cannons of all size, sea turtles, and valuable fishes, and to return to the Capital to submit all of these items in accordance with the current regulation”.

Bishop J.L. Taberd, in his 1837 “Note on the Geography of Cochinchina” , also describes “Pracel or Paracels” as a part of Cochinchina’s territory and indicates that Cochinchinese people refer to Paracels as “Cát Vàng”. In An Nam đại quốc họa đồ (Hán-Nôm : 安南大國畫圖 ; English : The Map of the An Nam Empire) published in 1838, Bishop Taberd depicted part of Paracels and noted “Paracel seu Cát Vàng” (English : Paracel or Cát Vàng) for the islands farther than those near the shore of Central Viet Nam, corresponding to the area of the Paracel Islands nowadays.

Figure 4. Scanned image of An Nam đại quốc họa đồ (安南大國畫圖/Tabula geographica imperii Anamitici)

The map of Viet Nam under the Nguyễn Dynasty (c. 1838), Đại Nam nhất thống toàn đồ (Hán-Nôm : 大南ー統全圖 ; English : The Complete Map of the Unified Đại Nam) , indicated that “Hoàng Sa” (number 1) and “Vạn Lý Trường Sa” (number 2) are Vietnamese territories. These islands were depicted to be further offshore compared to those near the Central coast.

Figure 5. Scanned image of a portion of Đại Nam nhất thống toàn đồ (大南ー統全圖)

Đại Nam nhất thống chí (Hán-Nôm : 大南ー統志 ; English : The Geography of the Unified Đại Nam), the geography book completed in 1882 by Quốc sử quán (Hán-Nôm : 國史館 ; English : The National History Institute) of the Nguyễn Dynasty (1802–1845), indicates that the Paracel Islands are part of Viet Nam’s territory and was under the administration of the Province of Quảng Ngãi.

Figure 6. Scanned image of a page in Đại Nam nhất thống chí (大南ー統志)

In the paragraphs describing the topography of Quảng Ngãi Province, Đại Nam nhất thống chí reads :
“In the east of Quảng Ngãi Province is Hoàng Sa Island, in which sands and waters are alternate, forming trenches. In the west is the area of mountainous people with the steady and long rampart. The south borders the Province of Bình Định, separated by the Bến Đá mountain pass. The north borders the Province of Quảng Nam, marked by the Sa Thổ Creek (ghềnh) …”
“The previous custom of maintaining Hoàng Sa Flotilla was continued in the early days of the Gia Long Era but later abandoned. At the beginning of the Minh Mạng Era, working boats were sent to the area for sea route survey. They found an area with verdant plants over white sands and a circumference of 1,070 trượng . In the middle of Hoàng Sa Island is a well. In the southwest lies an ancient temple with no clear indication of the construction time. Inside the temple is a stele engraved with four characters “Vạn Lý Ba Bình” (Hán-Nôm : 萬里波平 ; English : calm sea for a thousand dặm). This island had previously been called “Phật Tự Sơn” (Hán-Nôm : 佛寺山 ; English : The Mountain of Buddha’s Temple). In the east and the west of the island is an atoll named Bàn Than Thạch (Hán-Nôm : 珊瑚石 ; English : coral reef). It emerges over the water level as an isle with a circumference of 340 trượng and a height of 1.2 trượng (same elevation as that of Hoàng Sa Island). In the 16th year of the Minh Mạng Era, working boats were ordered to transport bricks and stones to the area to build temple. In the left side of the temple, a stone stele was erected as a remark, and trees are planted all over three sides, namely the left, the right, and the back, of the temple. While building the temple’s foundation, the military labourers found as much as 2,000 catties of copper leaves and cast iron.”

Many Western navigators and Christian missionaries in the past centuries attested that Hoàng Sa (Pracel or Paracel) belongs to Viet Nam.
A Western clergyman wrote in a letter during his 1701 trip on the ship Amphitrite from France to China that : “Paracel is an archipelago of the Kingdom of An Nam” .
J.B. Chaigneau, one of the counsellors to Emperor Gia Long, wrote in the 1820 complementary note to his “Mémoire sur la Cochinchine” (English : Memoir on Cochinchina) that : “The Country of Cochinchina, whose emperor has just ascended to the throne, includes the Regions of Cochinchina and Tonkin … some inhabited islands not too far from the shore, and the Paracel Islands composed of uninhabited small islands, creeks, and cays.”

In the article “Geography of the Cochinchinese Empire” , written by Gutzlaff and published in 1849, some parts clearly indicate that Paracel is part of Viet Nam’s territory and even noted the islands with the Vietnamese name “Cát Vàng”.

As sovereigns of the country, successive feudal dynasties in Viet Nam had for many times conducted survey on the terrains and resources of the Paracel and the Spratly Islands over centuries. The results of these surveys have been recorded in Vietnamese geography and historical books since the 17th century.

Toản tập Thiên Nam tứ chí lộ đồ thư (Hán-Nôm : 纂集天南四至路图書 ; English : “The Collection of the South’s Road Map”) of the 17th century reads :
“In the middle of the sea is a long sandbank, called Bãi Cát Vàng, with a length of 400 dặm and a width of 20 dặm, spanning in the middle of the sea from Đại Chiêm to Sa Vinh Seaports . Foreign ships would be drifted and stranded on the bank if they traveled on the inner side (west) of the sandbank under the southwest wind or on the outer side under the northeast wind (east). Their sailors would starve to death and leave all their goods there .”

Đại Nam thực lục tiền biên (Hán-Nôm : 大南實錄前編 ; English : The First Part of The Chronicles of Đại Nam), the historical document collection about the Nguyễn lords completed by Quốc sử quán in 1844, reads :
“Offshore of An Vĩnh Commune, Bình Sơn District, Quảng Ngãi Prefecture, are more than 130 sandbanks whose distances from each other can take anywhere from a few watches to a few days to travel. They span an area of thousands of dặm, and are thus called “Vạn Lý Hoàng Sa”. There are freshwater wells on the sandbanks, and sea products of the area include sea cucumber, sea turtles, volutes, and so on and so forth.”
“Not long after the founding of the Dynasty, Hoàng Sa Flotilla was established with 70 sailors selected from An Vĩnh Commune. In the Third Month of every year, they sail for about three days to the islands. They collect goods there and return in the Eighth Month. There is also another flotilla named Bắc Hải, whose sailors are chosen from Tứ Chính Village in Bình Thuận or Cảnh Dương Commune, ordered to sail to Bắc Hải and Côn Lôn areas to collect goods. This flotilla is under the command of Hoàng Sa Flotilla.”

The parts covering the eras of Emperors Gia Long, Minh Mạng, and Thiệu Trị completed in 1848 in Đại Nam thực lục chính biên (Hán-Nôm : 大南實錄正編 ; English : The Main Part of The Chronicles of Đại Nam), the historical document collection about the Nguyễn emperors, record the events of : Emperor Gia Long’s possession of the Paracel Islands in 1816, and the temple construction, stele erection, tree planting, measurement and mapping of the islands following Emperor Minh Mạng’s order .

Volume 52 of Đại Nam thực lục chính biên reads :
“In the Bính Tý (Hán-Nôm : 丙子) year, the 15th year of the Gia Long Era (1816) … His Majesty the Emperor commanded the naval forces and Hoàng Sa Flotilla to sail to Hoàng Sa Islands for sea route survey.”

Volume 104 reads :
“In the Eighth Month, during the autumn, of the Quý Tỵ (Hán-Nôm : 癸巳) year, the 14th year of the Ming Mạng Era (1833) … His Majesty the Emperor told the Ministry of Public Works that : In the territorial waters of the Province of Quảng Ngãi, there is the Hoàng Sa range. The water and the sky in that range cannot be distinguished from afar. Trading boats have recently become victims of its shoal. We shall prepare sampans, waiting until next year to go to the area for constructing temple, erecting stele, and planting many trees. Those trees will grow luxuriant in the future, thus serving as recognition remarks for people to avoid getting stranded in shoal. That shall benefit everyone forever.”

Volume 154 reads :
“In the Sixth Month, during the summer, of the Ất Mùi (Hán-Nôm : 乙未) year, the 16th year of the Minh Mạng Era (1835) … a temple was built on Hoàng Sa Island, under the administration of Quảng Ngãi Province. Hoàng Sa, in the territorial waters of Quảng Ngãi, has a white sand island covered by luxuriant plants with a well in the middle. In the southwest of the island is an ancient temple in which there is a stele engraved with four characters “Vạn Lý Ba Bình” (Hán-Nôm : 萬里波平 ; English : calm sea for a thousand dặm). Bạch Sa Island has a circumference of 1,070 trượng ; previously referred to as Phật Tự Sơn, the island is surrounded by a gently-sloping atoll in the east, west, and south. In the north is an atoll named Bàn Than Thạch, emerging over the water level with a circumference of 340 trượng, an elevation of 1.3 trượng, as high as the sand island. Last year, His Majesty the Emperor had already considered ordering the construction of a temple and a stele on it, but the plan could not be executed due to harsh weather conditions. The construction had to be postponed until this year when the naval captain Phạm Văn Nguyên and his soldiers, the Capital’s patrol commander (giám thành), and labourers from the Provinces of Quảng Ngãi and Bình Định came and carried building materials with them to build the new temple (seven trượng away from the ancient temple). A stone stele and a screen were erected on the left hand side and in the front of the temple, respectively. They finished all the works in ten days and returned to mainland.”

Volume 165 reads :
“On the first of the First Month, during the spring, in the Bính Thân (Hán-Nôm : 丙申) year, the 17th year of the Ming Mạng Era (1836) … The Ministry of Public Works submitted a petition to His Majesty the Emperor, saying that : In the frontier of our country’s territorial waters, Hoàng Sa is a critical and hardly-accessible area. We have had the map of the area made ; however, due to its wide and long topography, the map only covers part of it, and this coverage is not sufficiently detailed. We shall deploy people to the area for detailed sea route survey. From now on, in the last ten days of the First Month of every year, we shall implore Your Majesty’s permission to select naval soldiers and the Capital’s patrolmen (vệ giám thành) to form a unit on a vessel. This unit shall travel to Quảng Ngãi within the first ten days of the Second Month, requesting the Provinces of Quảng Ngãi and Bình Định to employ four civilian boats to travel together to Hoàng Sa. For every island, cay, or sandbank that they encounter, they shall measure its length, width, elevation, area, circumference, and the surrounding water’s depth ; they shall record the presence of submerged cays and banks, and the topography. Maps shall be drawn from these measurements and records. Also, they shall record the departure date, departure seaports, directions, and estimated distance estimated on the traveling routes. These people shall also look for the shore to determine the provinces, their directions and distances to the surveyed positions. One and all must be recorded clearly and presented once they return.”
“His Majesty the Emperor approved the petition, ordered the naval detachment commander Phạm Hữu Nhật to command a battleship and bring ten wooden steles to be used as markers in the area. Each wooden stele is five thước long, five tấc wide, one tấc thick , and is engraved with characters meaning : The 17th year of the Minh Mạng Era, the Bính Thân year, Detachment Commander Phạm Hữu Nhật of the Navy, complying with the order to go to Hoàng Sa for management and survey purposes, arrived here and therefore placed this sign.”

Đại Nam thực lục chính biên also recorded that, in 1847, the Ministry of Public Works submitted a petition to Emperor Thiệu Trị, saying : “Hoàng Sa is within the territory of our country. It is a regular practice that we deploy boats to the area for sea route surveys every year. However, due to the busy work schedule of this year, we implore Your Majesty’s permission to postpone the survey trip until next year”. Emperor Thiệu Trị wrote “đình” (Hán-Nôm : 停 ; English : suspended) in the petition to approve it.

Figure 7. Scanned image of a page in Đại Nam thực lục chính biên (大南實錄正編)

The 1882 Đại Nam nhất thống chí (Hán-Nôm : 大南ー統志 ; English : The Geography of the Unified Đại Nam) reads :
“Hoàng Sa Islands lies in the east of Ré Island, under Bình Sơn District. From Sa Kỳ Seaport, it can take three or four days to sail to the islands under favourable wind. There are more than 130 small islands, separated by waters which can take a few watches or a few days to travel across. Within the islands is the golden sandbank spanning tens of thousands of dặm and thus called Vạn Lý Trường Sa. There are freshwater wells, and numerous birds gather on the bank. Sea products there include sea cucumbers, sea turtles, and volutes. Goods from ships wrecked by storms drift to the bank.”

Other books completed under the Nguyễn Dynasty such as the 1821 Lịch triều hiến chương loại chí (Hán-Nôm : 歴朝憲章類誌 ; English : Classified Rules of Dynasties), the 1833 Hoàng Việt dư địa chí (Hán-Nôm : 皇越輿地誌 ; English : Geography of the Viet Empire), the 1876 Việt sử thông giám cương mục khảo lược (Hán-Nôm : 越史通鑑綱目考略 ; English : Outline of the Viet History Chronicles) all have similar description for the Paracel Islands.

Figure 8. Scanned image of the petition that the Ministry of Public Works submitted to Emperor Thiệu Trị in 1847 with the Emperor’s approving note highlighted in the red circle.

Due to the aforementioned richness of sea products and goods from wrecked ships in the Paracel and the Spratly Islands, the Vietnamese feudal dynasties had long exploited sovereignty over the islands. Many ancient history and geography books of Viet Nam provide evidence of the organization and operation of the Hoàng Sa flotillas, which performed these exploitation duties.

Succeeding the Nguyễn lords in governing the country, the Tây Sơn Dynasty always paid fair attention to maintaining and deploying Hoàng Sa flotillas although it had to continuously deal with the invasions of the China’s Qing Dynasty and Siam. Under the Tây Sơn Dynasty, the Imperial Court continued organizing various forms of exploitation of the Paracel Islands with the awareness that it was exercising the sovereignty over the islands.

From the foundation of the Nguyễn Dynasty in 1802 until the 1884 Treaty of Huế with France, the Nguyễn emperors had made every effort to consolidate Viet Nam’s sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands.

Hoàng Sa Flotilla, later reinforced by Bắc Hải Flotilla, was maintained and continuously active under the Nguyễn lords (1558–1783) to the Tây Sơn Dynasty (1786–1802) and the Nguyễn Dynasty (1802–1945).

In conclusion, ancient history and geography books of Viet Nam as well as evidence found in documents written by several Western navigators and clergymen all point to the fact that successive dynasties in Viet Nam have been the sovereigns of the Paracel and the Spratly Islands for centuries. The Vietnamese states-founded Hoàng Sa flotillas’ regular presence from five to six months annually to perform certain duties in these islands is itself incisive evidence demonstrating the exercise of Vietnamese sovereignty. The acquisition and exploitation by Vietnamese sovereign states of these islands were never opposed by any other countries, further proving that the Paracel and the Spratly Islands have long been part of Viet Nam’s territory.

Sovereignty Exercise over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands Continued by France on Behalf of Viet Nam
Since the conclusion of the Treaty of Huế on June 6th, 1884, France had represented Viet Nam in all of its external relations and protected Viet Nam’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. Within the framework of those commitments, the Viet Nam’s sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands was exercised by France. That sovereignty exercise is clearly illustrated with numerous examples of which some are listed below.

The French battleships often patrolled in the South China Sea, referred to as “Biển Đông” (English : The East Sea) by Vietnamese, including the areas of the Paracel and the Spratly Islands.

In 1899, Paul Doumer, the then Governor-General of Indochina, sent a proposal to Paris for building a lighthouse on Pattle Island (đảo Hoàng Sa) within the Paracel Islands to guide ships in the area. The plan, however, was abandoned due to budget issue.

Since 1920, Indochinese ships of customs had intensified their patrol in the area of the Paracel Islands to prevent smuggling.

In 1925, the Institute of Oceanography in Nha Trang sent the ship De Lanessan for an oceanography survey in the Paracel Islands. In addition to A. Krempf, the then Institute’s Director, and other researchers including Delacour and Jabouille also joined the trip for their geological and biological research and other studies. Also in 1925, the Minister of Military Affairs (Hán-Nôm : 兵部尚書) Thân Trọng Huề of the Imperial Court reaffirmed that the Paracel Islands are within Viet Nam’s territory.

In 1927, the ship De Lanessan went to the Paracel Islands for a scientific survey.
In 1929, the Pierre de Rouville delegation proposed that four lighthouses to be set up at four corners of the Paracel Islands, namely Triton (Tri Tôn) and Lincoln (Linh Côn) Islands, and the North (Đá Bắc) and Bombay Reefs (bãi Bông Bay).
In 1930, the gunboat La Malicieuse went to the Paracel Islands.
In March 1931, the ship Inconstant went to the Paracel Islands.
In June 1931, the ship De Lanessan went to the Paracel Islands.
In May 1932, the battleship Alerte went to the Paracel Islands.
From April 13th, 1930 to April 12th, 1933, the Government of France deployed the naval units to garrison in major islands of the Spratly Islands, namely Spratly (Trường Sa Lớn), Amboyna Cay (An Bang), Itu Aba (Ba Bình), Group des Deux Iles (Song Tử) [23], Loaita (Loai Ta), and Thitu (Thị Tứ).
On December 21st, 1933, the then Governor of Cochinchina (Thống đốc Nam Kỳ) M.J. Krautheimer signed the decree of annexing the islands of Spratly, Amboyna Cay, Itu Aba, Song Tử group, Loaita, and Thitu to the Province of Bà Rịa [24].
In 1937, the French authorities sent a civil engineer named Gauthier to the Paracel Islands to examine the positions for building lighthouses and a seaplane terminal.
In February 1937, the patrol ship Lamotte Piquet commanded by Rear-Admiral Istava came to the Paracel Islands.

Figure 9. Scanned image of Decree no. 4702–CP of December 21st, 1933 issued by the Governor of Cochinchina.

On March 29th, 1938, Emperor Bảo Đại signed the Imperial Edict to split the Paracel Islands from the Province of Nam Nghĩa and annex them to the Province of Thừa Thiên [25]. The Edict reads :
“Consider that the Hoàng Sa Islands (Archipel des îles Paracels) have been for long under the sovereignty of Nước Nam [12], and directly under the Province of Nam Nghĩa during the previous dynasties’ time, and that this administration had not been changed until the reign of Thế tổ Cao hoàng đế [26] as all the communications with these islands were carried out via the seaports in the Province of Nam Nghĩa ;
Consider that by nautical progress, the communications have changed, and that the Imperial Court’s representative who went on an inspection tour and the Protectorate’s representative petitioned to annex those islands to the Province of Thừa Thiên for the sake of convenience ;
Order :
Single item – To annex the Hoàng Sa Islands (Archipel des îles Paracels) to the Province of Thừa Thiên. In terms of administration, these islands are under the command of the Governor of the Province.”

Figure 10. Scanned image of the Imperial Edict signed by Emperor Bảo Đại on March 29th, 1938.

On June 15th, 1938, the then Governor-General of Indochina Jules Brévié signed the decree on establishing an administrative unit in the Paracel Islands under Thừa Thiên Province.
In 1938, France erected a sovereignty stele, completed the constructions of a lighthouse, a meteorological station, a the radio station on Pattle Island (Vietnamese : đảo Hoàng Sa ; French : Île Pattle), and a meteorological station and a radio station on Itu Aba Island within the Paracel Islands. The inscription on the stele reads : “The French Republic, The Kingdom of An Nam, The Paracel Islands, 1816 – Pattle Island – 1938” (1816 and 1938 are the years of Viet Nam’s sovereignty exercise over the Paracel Islands by Emperor Gia Long, and of the French erection of the stele, respectively).

Figure 11. The sovereignty stele erected by France in 1938.

On May 5th, 1939, the Governor-General of Indochina Jules Brévié signed a decree on amendment of the decree of June 15th, 1938. The new decree established two administrative delegations, namely the Delegations of Croissant And Its Dependents, and Amphirite And Its Dependents.

For the whole time of representing Viet Nam for its external relations, France consistently affirmed the sovereignty of Viet Nam over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands, and protested those actions that seriously violated this sovereignty. For instance, on December 4th, 1931 and April 24th, 1932, France opposed the Government of China on the intention of the Guangdong (Hán-Nôm : 廣東) provincial authorities to invite bids for exploiting guano on the Paracel Islands. Other examples include the France’s announcement on July 24th, 1933 to Japan that its armed forces would encamp on major islands within the Spratly Islands ; and the France’s objection on April 4th, 1939 to the Japan’s inclusion of some islands within the Spratly Islands under its jurisdiction.

Figure 12. Scanned image of the Decree of May 5th, 1939 issued by the Governor-General Jules Brévié.

Protection And Exercise of Viet Nam’s Sovereignty over The Paracel and the Spratly Islands Since The End of World War II
After returning to Indochina after World War II, in early 1947, France requested the Republic of China to withdraw their troops from some islands within the Paracel and the Spratly Islands that had been illegitimately occupied in late 1946. The French armed forces then arrived at the islands to replace those of China and to rebuild their meteorological and radio stations.

Figure 13. Scanned images of the World Meteorological Organization documents containing information about the Viet Nam’s meteorological stations in the Sprartly Islands (on Itu Aba) (left) and the Paracel Islands (right) in 1949 and 1973, respectively.

On September 7th, 1951, Trần Văn Hữu, the head of the State of Viet Nam’s delegation at the San Francisco Conference on the Treaty of Peace with Japan, declared that the Paracel and the Spratly Islands have long been the territories of Viet Nam, and that “to take full advantage of every chance to prevent any seed of dispute in the future, we affirm our long-standing sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands”. This statement did not meet any objections and/or reserves of opinion.

In 1953, the French ship Ingénieur en chef Girod went on its survey trip on oceanography, geology, geography, and ecology in the Paracel Islands.

Later governments in South Viet Nam, including both the Sài Gòn Administration (the Republic of Viet Nam), and the Provisional Revolutionary Government of the Republic of South Viet Nam (abbr. RSVN Government), exercised Viet Nam’s sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands as clearly showed by the following examples.

In 1956, the naval forces of the Sài Gòn Administration took over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands when France withdrew its troops. In the same year, with the assistance of the Sài Gòn Administration’s naval forces, the Department of Mining, Technology, & Small Industries (Sở hầm mỏ, công nghệ & tiểu công nghiệp) organized a survey on four islands within the Paracel Islands, namely Pattle (Hoàng Sa), Money (Quang Ảnh), Robert (Hữu Nhật), and Drumond (Duy Mộng).

Figure 14. Scanned image of the statement of Trần Văn Hữu, head of the State of Viet Nam’s delegation at the 1951 San Francisco Conference on the Treaty of Peace with Japan.

On October 22nd, 1956, the Sài Gòn Administration placed the Spratly Islands under the Province of Phước Tuy.

On July 13th, 1961, the Sài Gòn Administration transferred the jurisdiction of the Paracel Islands from the Province of Thừa Thiên to the Province of Quảng Nam. The administrative commune of Định Hải, headed by an administrative envoy directly under the District of Hòa Vang, was established in the islands.

Figure 15. Scanned image of Decree 174-NV of the President of the Republic of Viet Nam on transferring the jurisdiction of the Paracel Islands from Thừa Thiên to Quảng Nam Provinces.

From 1961 to 1963, the Sài Gòn Administration built sovereignty steles on major islands within the Spratly Islands such as Spratly, Itu Aba, and the Southwest Cay.

Figure 16. The sovereignty stele erected by the Republic of Viet Nam on Spratly Island in 1961.

On October 21st, 1969, the Sài Gòn Administration annexed Định Hải Commune into Hòa Long Commune, also under Hòa Vang District of Quảng Nam Province.

In July 1973, the Institute of Agricultural Research (Viện khảo cứu nông nghiệp) under the Ministry of Agricultural Development & Land (Bộ phát triển nông nghiệp & điền địa) conducted its investigation on Namyit Island (Nam Ai or Nam Yết) within the Spratly Islands.

In August 1973, the Sài Gòn Administration’s Ministry of National Planning & Development (Bộ kế hoạch & phát triển quốc gia), in collaboration with Marubeni Corporation of Japan, conducted an investigation on phosphates in the Paracel Islands.

On September 6th, 1973, the Sài Gòn Administration annexed the islands of Spratly, Itu Aba, Loaita, Thitu, Namyit, Sin Cowe (Sinh Tồn), the Northeast and Southwest Cays, and other adjacent islands into Phước Hải Commune, Đất Đỏ District, Phước Tuy Province [27].

Figure 17. Scanned image of Decree 420-BNV/HCĐP/26 of the Ministry of the Interior
of the Republic of Viet Nam on annexing the Spratly Islands into the Province of Phước Tuy.

Fully aware of the long-standing sovereignty of Viet Nam over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands, the governments in South Viet Nam all showed efforts to protect the sovereignty against any violations and/or disputes over the two archipelagos.

On June 16th, 1956, the Sài Gòn Administration’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued a statement to re-affirm Viet Nam’s sovereignty over the Spratly Islands. In the same year, the Sài Gòn Administration strongly objected to the occupation of the eastern islands within the Paracel Islands by the People’s Republic of China.

On February 22nd, 1959, the Sài Gòn Administration detained for some time 82 people who claimed to be “fishermen” from the People’s Republic of China and had landed on the islands of Robert, Drummond, and Duncan (Quang Hoà) within the Paracel Islands.

On April 20th, 1971, the Sài Gòn Administration once again re-affirmed that the Spratly Islands are Viet Nam’s territories. This affirmation of Viet Nam’s sovereignty over the Islands was repeated by the Sài Gòn Administration’s Foreign Minister in the July 13th, 1971 press conference.

On January 19th, 1974, the military forces of the People’s Republic of China occupied the southwestern islands of the Paracel Islands ; this violation of Viet Nam’s territorial integrity was condemned in the same day by the Sài Gòn Administration. The RSVN Government declared its three-point position on the solution for territorial disputes on January 26th, 1974, and re-affirmed Viet Nam’s sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands on February 14th, 1974.

On June 28th, 1974, the RSVN Government claimed its sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands at the Third Law of Sea Conference in Caracas, Venezuela. On May 5th and 6th, 1975, the RSVN Government announced its liberation of the Spratly Islands, which had been under the control of the Sài Gòn Administration.

In September 1975, the delegation of the RSVN Government at the Colombo Meteorological Conference stated that the Paracel Islands are Viet Nam’s territories, and requested that the Viet Nam’s meteorological station in the Islands to be registered in the WMO’s list of meteorological stations (this station had previously been entered in the WMO’s list under the registration number 48.860).

After the country’s re-unification, the State of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam has been promulgating many critical legal documents on sea and the Paracel and the Spratly Islands. These include : the 1977 Statement by the Government of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam on Viet Nam’s Territorial Waters, Contiguous Zones, Exclusive Economic Zones, and Continental Shelf ; the 1982 Statement by the Government of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam on the Basic Line Used in the Calculation of the Area of Viet Nam’s Territorial Waters ; the 1992 Constitution of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam ; the 1994 Resolution of the Fifth Session of the Ninth National Assembly of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam on Ratification the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) ; and the 2003 Law of the National Borders.

In terms of administration, the Government of Viet Nam made the Spratly and the Paracel Islands districts (huyện) under Đồng Nai and Quảng Nam–Đà Nẵng Provinces, respectively. After some administrative revisions, the Paracel Islands are currently under the City of Đà Nẵng, while the Spratly Islands belong to Khánh Hòa Province.

The Government of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam has repeatedly affirmed Viet Nam’s sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands in diplomatic notes sent to the involved parties, in the statements of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and in international meetings including the WMO meeting in Geneva (June 1980) and in the International Geological Congress in Paris (July 1980).

Viet Nam has for several times issued its white papers (in 1979, 1981, and 1988) on the sovereignty of Viet Nam over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands to affirm that these two archipelagos are inseparable territories of Viet Nam, and that Viet Nam has full sovereignty over them in accordance with international laws and practice.

On March 14th, 1988, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam issued a statement condemning the China’s act that caused military conflict and its seizure of some submerged cays from Viet Nam in the Spratly Islands.

In April 2007, the Government of Viet Nam established Trường Sa Township (thị xã), Song Tử Tây and Sinh Tồn Communes (xã) under Trường Sa District (huyện) in the Spratly Islands.

Conclusion
In summary, there are three major points one can clearly conclude with references to the aforementioned historical documents as well as international law and practice.

First, successive sovereign states in Viet Nam have actually possessed the Paracel and the Spratly Islands for long since the time when there was no sovereignty claim over those archipelagos.

Second, for hundreds of years since the 17th century, Viet Nam has indeed exercised its sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands in a continuous and peaceful manner.

And third, Viet Nam has always been proactive in protecting its rights and titles against any intentions and actions that violate Viet Nam’s sovereignty, territorial integrity, and rights in the Paracel and the Spratly Islands.

APPENDIX
Some International Documents And Treaties Related to Viet Nam’s Sovereignty over The Paracel And The Spratly Islands

1. The Cairo Communiqué on November 27th, 1943
When World War II entered its fiercest stage, a conference of the three powers of the Allies, namely the United Kingdom of Great Britain & North Ireland, the United States of America, and the Republic of China (represented by Chiang Kai-shek), was organized in Cairo, Egypt. The Cairo Communiqué [28], the outcome of the conference, states that : “The Three Great Allies are fighting this war to restrain and punish the aggression of Japan. They covet no gain for themselves and have no thought of territorial expansion. It is their purpose that Japan shall be stripped off all the islands in the Pacific which she has seized or occupied since the beginning of the first World War in 1914, and that all the territories Japan has stolen from the Chinese, such as Manchuria, Formosa, and The Pescadores, shall be restored to the Republic of China.”
In accordance to this statement, the three Great Allies expressed their purpose to force Japan to return to the Republic of China those territories that were seized from the Chinese, including Manchuria, Formosa (Taiwan), and the Pescadores (Penghu), without any mention of the Paracel and the Spratly Islands.

2. Potsdam Declaration on July 26th, 1945
Heads of state and government of the United States of America, the United Kingdom of Great Britain & North Ireland, and the Republic of China declared that the terms given in the 1943 Cairo Communiqué should be executed [28]. After declaring war with Japan in the Far East, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics also joined this Declaration.
The Potsdam Agreement assigned China the responsibility to disarm the Japanese forces in the north of the 16o Latitude in Viet Nam. Accordingly, from late 1946, Chiang Kai-shek’s troops entered the northern provinces and the Paracel Islands of Viet Nam. Their disarming activities in these areas do not mean, in any sense, affirmation and/or restoration of Chinese sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands.

3. Treaty of Peace with Japan in 1951
The San Francisco Conference on the Treaty of Peace with Japan was held from September 4th to 8th, 1951 with the attendance of 51 countries. Article 2 in Chapter II of the draft treaty states that Japan shall renounce all rights, titles, and claims to specific territories that are listed. These territories include : Korea, Formosa (Taiwan), the Pescadores (Penghu), the Kuril Islands, the southern portion of Sakhalin Island, the Pacific islands, Antarctic areas, the Spratly Islands, and the Paracel Islands.
At the plenary session on September 5th, 1951, the Conference agreed with the decision of the Conference’s President to reject another proposal requesting “that Japan shall recognize the complete sovereignty of the People’s Republic of China over Manchuria, Formosa and its adjacent islands, Penlinletao (the Pescadores), the Tunshatsuntao Islands (Pratas), the Sishatsuntao and Chunshatsuntao (the Paracel Islands, the Amphirites, and the Maxfield submerged cays), and the Nanshatsundao (including the Spratly Islands), and that Japan shall renounce all rights, titles, and claims to these territories”. This rejection decision was approved by the Conference with 46 ayes, three noes, and one abstain. Countries that voted to reject this proposal include Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Cambodia, Canada, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, France, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States, Viet Nam, and Japan.
In the ratified Treaty of Peace with Japan, Article 2 of Chapter II [29] remains unchanged as it had initially been drafted, which states :
“(a) Japan, recognizing the independence of Korea, renounces all right, title and claim to Korea, including the islands of Quelpart, Port Hamilton and Dagelet.
(b) Japan renounces all right, title and claim to Formosa and the Pescadores.
(c) Japan renounces all right, title and claim to the Kurile Islands, and to that portion of Sakhalin and the islands adjacent to it over which Japan acquired sovereignty as a consequence of the Treaty of Portsmouth of September 5th, 1905.
(d) Japan renounces all right, title and claim in connection with the League of Nations Mandate System, and accepts the action of the United Nations Security Council of April 2nd, 1947, extending the trusteeship system to the Pacific islands formerly under mandate of Japan.
(e) Japan renounces all claim to any right or title to or interest in connection with any part of the Antarctic area, whether deriving from the activities of Japanese nationals or otherwise.
(f) Japan renounces all right, title and claim to the Spratly Islands and to the Paracel Islands.”
Apparently, the territories proclaimed by the 1943 Cairo Communiqué and the 1951 Treaty of Peace with Japan to be under China’s sovereignty only include Taiwan and Penghu. The fact that the Treaty of Peace with Japan places Taiwan and Penghu together in one item (Item b), and the Paracel and the Spratly Islands together in a separate item (Item f) implies that the Paracel and the Spratly Islands are not recognized as parts of China.
Also at the 1951 San Francisco Conference, on September 7th, 1951, Trần Văn Hữu, the head of the State of Viet Nam’s delegation, declared that the Paracel and the Spratly Islands have long been the territories of Viet Nam, and that “to take full advantage of every chance to prevent any seed of dispute in the future, we affirm our long-standing sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands”. None of the representatives of 51 countries attending the Conference objected to and/or expressed their wish to reserve opinions about this statement.

All of these aforementioned documents and evidence clearly demonstrate that international legal documents, from the Cairo Communiqué of November 27th, 1943 (re-affirmed by the Potsdam Declaration of July 26th, 1945) to the San Francisco Treaty of Peace with Japan of September 8th, 1951, do not recognize the sovereignty of any other countries over the Viet Nam’s Paracel and Spratly Islands. Also, the fact that none of the countries attending the 1951 San Francisco Conference objected to or wished to reserve their opinion on the statement of the Viet Nam’s delegation on Viet Nam’s sovereignty over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands shows that the international community implicitly recognized the sovereignty of Viet Nam over the Paracel and the Spratly Islands.

Jeu ba, 05 Thang 4 2011 16:42

La souveraineté incontestable du Viet Nam sur les îles Paracel

Publié en ligne le 30 Janvier 2011, par le Comité national des affaires Border
Ministère des Affaires Etrangères de la République socialiste du Viet Nam

* L’article original en vietnamien peut être trouvé à l’adresse :

Traduit par Nguyễn Trịnh DJON


Notes de la rédaction : Le 19 Janvier 2011, le Bureau d’information du Conseil d’Etat de la République populaire de Chine a publié un article intitulé « faits et chiffres que" sur la saisie des îles Paracel du Viet Nam par la Chine. L’article a écrit : « Le 19 Janvier 1974, nos forces et des personnes sur les îles Xisha armées (chinois) ont mené avec succès une contre-attaque dans le but de protéger l’auto-défense et la souveraineté contre les forces armées fantoches sud-vietnamiens, qui avaient été continuellement violer nos eaux territoriales et l’espace aérien, qui occupe nos îles, et tuant et blessant nos pêcheurs. "
Pour suivre l’histoire avec plus d’informations, la Banque asiatique Research Foundation mer du Sud-Est (Quy Nghien Cuu bien Djong) présente ci-après un essai par le Comité national des affaires frontalières du ministère des Affaires étrangères du Viet Nam qui utilise des preuves historiques et juridiques pour faire valoir que le Viet Nam possède une souveraineté incontestable sur les Paracel et les îles Spratly (qui sont désignés comme "Hoàng Sa" et "Truong Sa", respectivement, par les Vietnamiens).

Le Paracels (Hoang Sa) et les îles Spratly (Truong Sa) sont deux archipels au large des côtes du Viet Nam. Le point des îles Paracel plus proche se trouve à 120 miles marins à l’est de la ville de Đà Nang et l’île de Ré, une île côtière du Viet Nam, tandis que le point de la îles Spratly plus proche se trouve à 250 miles nautiques à l’est de la baie de Cam Ranh.

Dans les premiers jours, avec seulement des informations vagues sur le Paracel et les îles Spratly, les navigateurs ne savaient qu’il y avait une grande zone de bancs de sable immergés dangereux pour les embarcations dans le milieu de la mer de Chine méridionale, dénommée « la Mer de l’Est » ( Bien Djong) en vietnamien. Documents vietnamiens antiques indiquent ce domaine avec des noms différents, y compris "Bai Cát Vang" (en anglais : Golden banc de sable), "Hoang Sa" (Han-Nom : 黄沙 ; Anglais : Sable d’or), "Van Ly Hoang Sa" (Han- Nom : 万里 黄沙 ; anglais : Dix-Mille-Dam Golden Sand), "Đại Truong Sa" (Han-Nom : 大 长沙 ; anglais : Grand-long Sand), ou « Van Ly Truong Sa" (Han-Nom : 万里长沙 ; anglais : Dix-Mille-barrage de sable Long).

La plupart des cartes nautiques faites par les navigateurs occidentaux du 16e au 18e siècles représentent l’Paracel et les îles Spratly comme un seul archipel et nommez-le "pracel", "colis", ou "Paracels". Plus tard, les progrès de la science et de la navigation a permis de différencier entre les deux archipels. Il n’était pas jusqu’à il ya environ deux cents ans (1787-1788) que les îles Paracel se trouvaient clairement et précisément comme ils sont connus aujourd’hui. Ce travail de localiser les îles Paracel par la mission d’enquête Kergariou-Locmaria aidé distinguer l’archipel des îles Spratly dans le sud.

Toutes les cartes mentionnées ci-dessus représentent pracel (incluant à la fois les Paracel et les îles Spratly) comme une zone au milieu de la mer de Chine méridionale à l’est du continent Viet Nam et situé plus au large par rapport aux îles côtières du Viet Nam. Les deux archipels indiqué que le "Paracel » et le « Spratly" (ou "Spratley") Iles de cartes nautiques internationaux actuels sont en effet ceux qui sont appelés "Hoàng Sa" et "Truong Sa", respectivement, par les Vietnamiens.

Figure 1. Une carte nautique portugaise du 16ème siècle représentant le Paracel et les îles Spratly comme un seul archipel situé à l’est de la partie continentale du Viet Nam.

La souveraineté historique du Viet Nam au cours des Paracel et les îles Spratly
Le peuple vietnamien depuis longtemps l’Paracel et les îles Spratly, et le Viet Nam a occupé et a exercé sa souveraineté sur les deux archipels de manière continue et paisible.

Plusieurs livres et des cartes au Vietnam géographie anciennes indiquent clairement que "Bai Cát Vang", également connu sous différents noms tels que "Hoàng Sa", "Van Ly Hoang Sa", "Đại Truong Sa", ou "Van Ly Truong Sa" , a longtemps été inclus dans le territoire du Viet Nam.
Toan TAP Thiên Nam TU chí Lo Djo JEU (Han-Nom : 纂 集 天 南 四至 路 图书 ; anglais : "The Handbook of du Sud Feuille de route »), compilée au 17ème siècle par Đỗ Bá Công Đạo, clairement indiqué dans le cartes de Quang Ngai Préfecture Quang Nam qu ’« il a été un long banc de sable au milieu de la mer qui est appelé Bai Cát Vang », et que « durant le dernier mois de chaque hiver, les dirigeants Nguyen envoyer des dix-huit bateaux là pour recueillir des marchandises , principalement des bijoux, de l’argent, des armes et des munitions ".

Figure 2. L’image numérisée d’une page de Toan TAP Thiên Nam TU chí Lo Djo JEU (纂 集 天 南 四至 路 图书)

Dans la carte 1774 sur Djang Trong (Sud Viet Nam) a appelé Giap ONG Nien Djo Bình Nam (HAN-Nom : 甲午 年 平 南 图 ; anglais : Le Plan pour la pacification du Sud dans la Giap ONG année), par Đoan Quan Cong (Han-Nom : 端 郡公 ; anglais : Duke du comté Đoan) Bui The Đạt, Bai Cát Vang est aussi indiqué comme une partie du territoire du Viet Nam.

Au cours de sa mission dans le sud du Viet Nam, l’érudit Lê Quy DJON (Han-Nom : 黎 贵 惇) (1726-1784) a compilé les 1776 Bien Phu TAP Luc (Han-Nom : 抚 边 杂 录 ; anglais : Miscellanées sur la Pacification à la frontière) sur l’histoire, la géographie et l’administration du Sud Viet Nam sous les seigneurs Nguyen (1558-1775). Dans cet ouvrage, Le Quy DJON décrit que Đại Truong Sa (Paracel y compris le et les îles Spratly) était sous la juridiction de Quang Ngãi Préfecture.

Figure 3. Les images numérisées des pages décrivant l’Paracel et les îles Spratly dans Bien Phu TAP Luc (抚 边 杂 录)

« Une commune Vĩnh (XA), Bình Sơn District (Huyen) Quang Ngãi Préfecture (PHU) a une montagne en dehors de son port. Cette grande montagne de 30 barrage est appelé l’île de Ré (Cu Lao). Il faut quatre montres (Canh) pour rejoindre l’île, sur laquelle il ya une salle (Phuong) nommé TU Chinh avec des haricots de culture habitants. Plus au large sont le Đại Truong Sa Îles, où il ya beaucoup de produits de la mer et d’autres biens. Il faut Hoang Sa flottille, fondée à retirer ces produits et marchandises, trois jours pour atteindre les îles, qui sont près de Bac Hai ".

"Bình Sơn district de Quang Ngãi Préfecture comprend la commune côtière de La Vĩnh. Offshore au nord-est de Une Vĩnh sont nombreuses îles et environ 130 montagnes séparées par des eaux qui peut prendre de quelques montres à quelques jours de voyager à travers. Ruisseaux d’eau douce peuvent être trouvés sur ces montagnes. Dans les îles est un long banc de sable doré plat et large de 30 Dam, sur laquelle l’eau est si transparente que l’on peut voir à travers. Les îles sont riches en nids rapides, et il ya des centaines ou des milliers d’autres espèces d’oiseaux, ils descendre autour au lieu d’éviter les humains. Il ya beaucoup de bibelots sur le banc de sable. Parmi les volutes (OC RVA) sont les volutes indiennes (OC tai voi). Une volute Indian ici peuvent être aussi gros comme un tapis, sur leur face ventrale sont des perles opaques, différentes de perles, qui sont aussi gros que le bout des doigts ; leur coquille peut être sculpté pour faire des badges d’identification (TAM bài) ou calciné pour fournir de la chaux pour construction de la maison. Il ya aussi des conques (OC Xa CU) qui peut être utilisé pour la marqueterie de meubles, et les coquilles Babylon (OC Hương). Tous les escargots ici peuvent être salés pour se nourrir. Les tortues de mer sont surdimensionnés. Il ya une tortue à carapace molle mer appelé "Hai Ba" ou "Bong Trang", similaire mais plus petit que les tortues normales de mer imbriquées ; leur coquille mince peut être utilisé pour incrustation de meubles, et leurs œufs taille du pouce peut être salé pour aliments. Il ya une sorte de concombres de mer appelé « đột đột", normalement vu lors de la baignade sur le rivage, ils peuvent être utilisés comme denrées alimentaires après traitement à la chaux, la suppression de l’intestin et le séchage. Avant de servir đột đột, il faut la traiter avec du crabe d’eau douce d’extraire et de gratter toute la saleté. Ce sera mieux si elle est cuite avec des crevettes et de porc.

Bateaux étrangers se réfugient souvent dans ces îles pour éviter les tempêtes. Les dirigeants ont mis en place Nguyen Hoang Sa flottille avec soixante-dix marins choisis parmi une commune Vĩnh sur une base de rotation. Marins sélectionnés recevront leur ordre dans le troisième mois de chaque année, apportent avec eux suffisamment de nourriture pour six mois, et naviguer sur cinq petits bateaux de pêche pendant trois jours complets pour atteindre les îles. Une fois installés sur les îles, ils sont libres d’attraper le plus grand nombre d’oiseaux et de poissons comme ils aiment. Ils recueillent des marchandises en provenance de passage des bateaux, tels que des sabres, des bijoux, de l’argent, des bagues de porcelaine, et de la fourrure, ils recueillent également beaucoup de coquillages de tortue, concombres de mer et coquillages volute. Les marins retournent à la terre ferme dans le huitième mois par Seaport Eo. A leur retour, ils naviguent premier à Phú Xuân Citadelle, où les marchandises qu’ils ont recueillies seront soumises à mesurer et classés, ils peuvent alors prendre leurs parties de volutes, des tortues de mer et les concombres de mer pour leurs propres activités de négociation, et recevoir des licences avant de rentrer à la maison. La quantité de matières recueillies varie, parfois, les marins ne pouvaient pas percevoir quoi que ce soit. J’ai personnellement vérifié l’ordinateur portable de l’ancien capitaine flottille Thuyên Đức Hau, qui a enregistré la quantité de marchandises collectées : 30 cuillères d’argent dans l’année de nham ONG (Han-Nom : 壬午, c’est à dire 1762), 5100 catties (CAN) d’étain dans l’année de Giap à (甲申, c’est à dire 1764), 126 boules d’argent dans l’année d’au DAU (乙酉, c’est à dire 1765), quelques marins carapaces de tortues chaque année à partir de l’année de Ky Suu (己丑 ; comme le 1769) pour l’année de Quy Ty (癸巳, c’est à dire 1773). Il y avait aussi des années où seule boîte cubique, bols en porcelaine, et deux canons de cuivre ont été recueillies.
Les dirigeants Nguyen a également établi Bac Hải Flottille sans un nombre fixe de marins, choisis parmi TU Chinh Village de Binh Thuan ou de Canh Dương commune. Les marins sont sélectionnés sur une base volontaire. Ceux qui se portent volontaires pour rejoindre la flottille seront exonérées du sondage impôt, patrouille et de transport frais. Ces marins se déplacent en petits bateaux de pêche à Bac Hai, Con Lôn Island, et d’autres îles dans la région de Hà Tiên, la collecte de marchandises des navires et des produits de la mer tels que les tortues, ormeaux et les concombres de mer. Bac Hải Flottille est sous le commandement de Hoàng Sa flottille. Les éléments recueillis sont pour la plupart produits de la mer et comportent rarement des bijoux ".

Parmi ces documents qui ont été préservés jusqu’à aujourd’hui est l’ordre suivant, daté 1786 faite par Lord Superior (Thuong Tuong Công) :
"Par la présente commande Hội Đức Hau, capitaine de Hoàng Sa flottille, pour mener quatre bateaux de pêche de naviguer directement vers Hoàng Sa et d’autres îles de la mer, de recueillir des bijoux, des objets en cuivre, des canons de toutes tailles, des tortues de mer et de poissons précieuses, et de revenir dans la capitale pour présenter l’ensemble de ces éléments conformément à la réglementation en vigueur ».

Mgr JL Taberd, dans son 1837 "Note sur la géographie de la Cochinchine », décrit également "pracel ou Paracels" comme une partie du territoire de la Cochinchine et indique que les gens se réfèrent à Cochinchinois Paracels que "chat Vang". Dans An Nam Đại Quốc Hoa Djo (Han-Nom : 安南 大 国画 图 ; anglais : La carte de l’An Empire Nam) publié en 1838, l’évêque Taberd représenté une partie de Paracels et a noté "Paracel seu Cát Vang" (en anglais : Paracel ou un chat Vang) pour les îles plus lointaines que celles près de la rive du centre du Viet Nam, correspondant à la zone des îles Paracel aujourd’hui.

Figure 4. L’image numérisée de An Nam Đại Quốc Hoa Djo (安南 大 国画 图 / Tabula geographica imperii Anamitici)

La carte du Viet Nam sous la dynastie des Nguyen (c. 1838), Đại Nam Nhat Thong Toàn Djo (Han-Nom : 大南 ー 統 全 圖 ; anglais : La carte complète du Unified Đại Nam), a indiqué que "Hoang Sa "(numéro 1) et" Van Ly Truong Sa "(numéro 2) sont des territoires vietnamiens. Ces îles ont été dépeints comme plus au large par rapport à ceux qui sont près de la côte centrale.

Figure 5. L’image numérisée d’une partie de Đại Nam Nhat Thong Toàn Djo (大南 ー 統 全 圖)

Đại Nam Nhat Thong Chi (Han-Nom : 大南 ー 統 志 ; anglais : The Geography of Unified Đại Nam), le livre de géographie complété en 1882 par Quốc Su quan (Han-Nom : 国 史馆 ; anglais : l’histoire nationale Institut) de la dynastie des Nguyen (1802-1845), indique que les îles Paracel font partie du territoire du Viet Nam et était sous l’administration de la province de Quang Ngãi.

Figure 6. L’image numérisée d’une page dans Đại Nam Nhat Thong Chi (大南 ー 統 志)

Dans les paragraphes décrivant la topographie de la province de Quang Ngai Đại Nam Nhat Thong chí lit comme suit :
"Dans l’est de la province de Quang Ngãi est Hoàng Sa île, où les sables et les eaux sont alternes, former des tranchées. Dans l’ouest est la région où vivent les montagnards avec le rempart stable et long terme. Le sud borde la province de Bình Định, séparés par le col du Dja Bến. Le Nord borde la province de Quang Nam, marquée par la Sa Tho Creek (ghềnh) ... "
"La coutume précédent de maintenir Hoàng Sa flottille a été poursuivie dans les premiers jours de la longue ère Gia, mais abandonné par la suite. Au début de l’ère Minh Mang, bateaux de travail ont été envoyés dans la région pour l’étude du tracé de la mer. Ils ont trouvé un endroit avec des plantes verdoyantes sur sables blancs et une circonférence de 1070 Truong. Au milieu de Hoàng Sa Island est un puits. Dans le sud-ouest se trouve un temple antique avec aucune indication claire de la durée de construction. A l’intérieur du temple est une stèle gravée de quatre caractères "Van Ly Ba Bình" (Han-Nom : 万里 波 平 ; anglais : mer calme pour un millier de barrage). Cette île avait déjà été appelé « Phat Tu Son" (Han-Nom : 佛寺 山 ; anglais : La Montagne du Temple de Bouddha). Dans l’est et l’ouest de l’île est un atoll nommé Bàn Than Thach (Han-Nom : 珊瑚石 ; anglais : récifs coralliens). Il se dégage sur le niveau de l’eau comme une île avec une circonférence de 340 Truong et une hauteur de 1,2 Truong (même hauteur que celle de Hoàng Sa Island). Dans la 16ème année de l’ère Minh Mang, bateaux de travail ont été commandés pour le transport de briques et de pierres dans la région pour construire le temple. Dans la partie gauche du temple, une stèle en pierre a été érigée comme une remarque, et les arbres sont plantés tous sur trois côtés, à savoir la gauche, la droite et le dos, du temple. Alors que la construction de la fondation du temple, les ouvriers ont trouvé militaires autant que 2.000 catties de feuilles de cuivre et la fonte ".

Beaucoup de navigateurs occidentaux et les missionnaires chrétiens dans les siècles passés ont attesté que Hoang Sa (Paracels ou pracel) appartient au Viet Nam.
Un ecclésiastique de l’Ouest a écrit dans une lettre au cours de son voyage 1701 sur l’Amphitrite du navire depuis la France vers la Chine que : « Paracel sont un archipel du Royaume de An Nam".
JB Chaigneau, l’un des conseillers de l’empereur Gia Long, écrit dans les années 1820 la note complémentaire à son « Mémoire sur la Cochinchine » (en anglais : Mémoire sur la Cochinchine) que : « Le Pays de la Cochinchine, dont l’empereur vient de monter sur le trône, comprend les régions de la Cochinchine et le Tonkin ... certaines îles habitées pas trop loin de la côte et les îles Paracel composés de petites îles, criques et îlots inhabités ».

Dans l’article « Géographie de l’Empire Cochinchinois", écrit par Gutzlaff et publié en 1849, certaines parties indiquent clairement que les Paracel fait partie du territoire du Viet Nam et même noter les îles avec le nom vietnamien "Vang chat".

Comme souverains du pays, les dynasties féodales successives au Viet Nam ont à plusieurs reprises mené l’enquête sur les terrains et les ressources du Paracel et les îles Spratly au cours des siècles. Les résultats de ces enquêtes ont été enregistrés dans la géographie du Vietnam et livres historiques depuis le 17ème siècle.

Toan TAP Thiên Nam TU chí Lo Djo JEU (Han-Nom : 纂 集 天 南 四至 路 图书 ; anglais : "La collection de la Sud de la Feuille de route ») du 17ème siècle est ainsi libellé :
"Au milieu de la mer est un long banc de sable, appelé Bai Cát Vang, d’une longueur de 400 barrage et d’une largeur de 20 barrages, s’étend au milieu de la mer de Đại Chiem à Sa Vinh ports maritimes. Les navires étrangers seraient dérivé et échoué sur la rive s’ils se sont rendus sur le côté intérieur (ouest) du banc de sable sous le vent sud-ouest ou sur le côté extérieur sous le vent nord-est (à l’est). Leurs marins mourraient de faim et de laisser tous leurs biens là-bas ».

Đại Nam Thuc Luc Tiền Bien (Han-Nom : 大 南 实录 前 编 ; anglais : la première partie de The Chronicles of Đại Nam), la collection des documents historiques sur les seigneurs Nguyễn complété par Quốc Su quán en 1844, est ainsi libellé :
« Large d’une commune Vinh Bình Sơn District Quang Ngãi Préfecture, sont plus de 130 bancs de sable dont les distances les uns des autres peut durer de quelques montres à quelques jours de voyager. Ils couvrent une superficie de plusieurs milliers de barrage, et sont donc appelés "Van Ly Hoang Sa". Il ya des puits d’eau douce sur les bancs de sable et de produits de la mer de la région comprennent le concombre de mer, tortues de mer, volutes, et ainsi de suite et ainsi de suite ".
"Peu de temps après la fondation de la dynastie, Hoàng Sa flottille a été établi avec 70 marins choisis parmi une commune Vĩnh. Dans le troisième mois de chaque année, ils naviguent pendant environ trois jours pour les îles. Ils recueillent des marchandises là-bas et revenir au huitième mois. Il ya aussi une autre flottille nommé Bac Hai, dont les marins sont choisis parmi TU Chinh Village de Binh Thuan ou Canh Dương commune, a ordonné de naviguer à Bac Hai et les zones Lon Con pour recueillir marchandises. Cette flottille est sous le commandement de Hoang Sa flottille ".

Les parties couvrant les époques des empereurs Gia Long, Minh Mang, Thieu Tri et achevé en 1848 à Đại Nam Thuc Luc Chinh Bien (Han-Nom : 大 南 实录 正 编 ; anglais : La partie principale de The Chronicles of Đại Nam), la collection des documents historiques sur les empereurs Nguyen, enregistrer les évènements de la possession de l’empereur Gia Long des îles Paracels en 1816, et la construction du temple, stèle érection, la plantation d’arbres, la mesure et la cartographie des îles suivantes empereur Minh l’ordre de Mang.

Volume 52 de Đại Nam Thuc Luc Chinh Biên lit comme suit :
« Dans le Binh Ty (Han-Nom : 丙子) année, la 15e année de la longue ère Gia (1816) ... Sa Majesté l’Empereur commandait les forces navales et Hoang Sa flottille de naviguer vers les îles Sa Hoàng l’enquête sur la voie maritime. "

Volume 104 est ainsi libellé :
« Dans le huitième mois, au cours de l’automne, de la TY Quy (Han-Nom : 癸巳) année, la 14e année de l’ère Ming Mang (1833) ... Sa Majesté l’Empereur a dit le ministère des Travaux publics que : Dans la territoriale eaux de la province de Quang Ngai il ya la plage Sa Hoàng. L’eau et le ciel dans cette gamme ne peuvent être distingués de loin. bateaux de commerce ont récemment été victimes de son banc. Nous allons préparer sampans, attendre l’année prochaine pour aller dans la zone pour la construction de temple, stèle érection, et la plantation de nombreux arbres. Ces arbres vont grandir luxuriant dans l’avenir, servant ainsi remarques de reconnaissance pour les personnes pour éviter d’avoir échoué dans banc. Qui doit bénéficier à tous pour toujours. "

Volume 154 est ainsi libellé :
"Au sixième mois, durant l’été, de l’au MUI (Han-Nom : 乙未) année, la 16ème année de l’ère Minh Mang (1835) ... un temple a été construit sur Hoàng Sa Island, sous l’administration de Quang Ngãi Province. Hoàng Sa, dans les eaux territoriales de Quang Ngai dispose d’un îlot de sable blanc couverte par des plantes luxuriantes avec un puits au milieu. Dans le sud-ouest de l’île est un ancien temple dans lequel il ya une stèle gravée de quatre caractères "Van Ly Ba Bình" (Han-Nom : 万里 波 平 ; anglais : mer calme pour un millier de barrage). Bạch Sa île a une circonférence de 1070 Truong, précédemment dénommé Phat Tu Son, l’île est entourée d’un atoll en pente douce dans l’est, l’ouest et au sud. Dans le nord est un atoll nommé Bàn Than Thach, émergeant sur le niveau d’eau d’une circonférence de 340 Truong, une élévation de 1,3 Truong, aussi haut que l’île de sable. L’an dernier, Sa Majesté l’Empereur avait déjà examiné ordonnant la construction d’un temple et une stèle sur elle, mais le plan n’a pas pu être exécutée en raison de conditions météorologiques difficiles. La construction a dû être reportée jusqu’à cette année, quand le capitaine de la marine Pham Van Nguyen et ses soldats, commandant de la patrouille de la capitale (Giam Thành) et les ouvriers des provinces de Quang Ngai Bình Định venus et réalisées matériaux de construction avec eux pour construire l’ nouveau temple (sept Truong loin de l’ancien temple). Une stèle en pierre et un écran ont été érigés sur le côté gauche et à l’avant du temple, respectivement. Ils ont terminé tous les travaux en dix jours et sont retournés à la terre ferme ".

Volume 165 est ainsi libellé :
"Sur le premier du premier mois, au printemps, dans le Binh à (Han-Nom : 丙申) année, la 17e année de l’ère Ming Mang (1836) ... Le ministère des Travaux publics a présenté une pétition à Sa Majesté l’empereur, en disant que : Dans la frontière des eaux territoriales de notre pays, Hoàng Sa est une zone critique et difficilement accessible. Nous avons eu la carte de la région fait, mais en raison de sa topographie large et longue, la carte ne couvre qu’une partie de celui-ci, et cette couverture n’est pas suffisamment détaillée. Nous allons déployer personnes dans la région pour enquête détaillée de la voie maritime. A partir de maintenant, dans les dix derniers jours du premier mois de chaque année, nous allons implorer la permission de Votre Majesté pour sélectionner les soldats de marine et les patrouilleurs de la capitale (Ve Giam Thành) pour former une unité sur un navire. Cette unité doit se rendre à Quảng Ngãi dans les dix premiers jours du deuxième mois, demandant aux provinces de Quang Ngai Bình Định d’employer quatre bateaux civils de voyager ensemble à Hoàng Sa. Pour chaque île, banc de sable, ou banc de sable qu’ils rencontrent, ils doivent mesurer sa longueur, largeur, hauteur, surface, la circonférence et la profondeur de l’eau environnante, ils doivent enregistrer la présence de bancs de sable et des bancs submergés, et la topographie. Les cartes doivent être tirées de ces mesures et d’enregistrements. En outre, ils doivent consigner la date de départ, les ports de départ, directions, et la distance estimée estimé sur les routes déplacement. Ces personnes doivent également rechercher la rive afin de déterminer les provinces, les directions et les distances aux postes étudiés. Les uns et les informations doivent être présentées et une fois de retour. "
« Sa Majesté l’Empereur a approuvé la requête, a ordonné le détachement naval commandant Phạm Hữu Nhat pour commander un navire de guerre et apporter dix stèles en bois pour être utilisés comme marqueurs dans la région. Chaque stèle en bois est cinq thuoc de long, cinq TAC large, un épais tac, et est gravée de caractères signifiant : La 17e année du Mang ère Minh, l’année de Thân Binh, commandant du détachement Phạm Hữu Nhat de la Marine, en respectant l’ordre aller à Hoàng Sa fins de gestion et d’enquête, est arrivé ici et donc placé ce signe ».

Đại Nam Thuc Luc Chinh Biên également enregistré qui, en 1847, le ministère des Travaux publics a présenté une pétition à l’empereur Thieu Tri, en disant : "Hoàng Sa est sur le territoire de notre pays. Il s’agit d’une pratique régulière que nous déployons bateaux dans la région pour les enquêtes sur la route de la mer chaque année. Toutefois, en raison de l’horaire de travail chargé de cette année, nous implorons la permission de Votre Majesté de reporter le voyage de l’enquête jusqu’à l’année prochaine ". Empereur Thieu Tri a écrit "Đình" (Han-Nom : 停 ; anglais : suspension) dans la pétition de l’approuver.

Figure 7. L’image numérisée d’une page dans Đại Nam Thuc Luc Chinh Bien (大 南 实录 正 编)

De 1882 Đại Nam Nhat Thong Chi (Han-Nom : 大南 ー 統 志 ; anglais : The Geography of Unified Đại Nam) se lit comme suit :
"Hoàng Sa Îles se situe dans l’est de l’île de Ré, sous Bình District fils. De Sa Ky Seaport, il peut prendre trois ou quatre jours pour naviguer vers les îles sous le vent favorable. Il ya plus de 130 petites îles, séparées par des eaux qui peut prendre quelques montres ou quelques jours à voyager à travers. Dans les îles est le banc de sable doré s’étendant sur des dizaines de milliers de barrage et ainsi appelé Van Ly Truong Sa. Il ya des puits d’eau douce, et de nombreux oiseaux se rassemblent sur la rive. Produits de la mer là-bas comprennent les concombres de mer, les tortues de mer, et des volutes. Les marchandises provenant des navires de terribles tempêtes dérive à la banque ".

D’autres livres accomplies sous la dynastie des Nguyen comme le 1821 Lich Trieu Hien Chuong loai Chi (Han-Nom : 歴 朝 宪章 类 志 ; anglais : Règles des petites dynasties), le 1833 Hoàng Việt Du DJIA Chi (Han-Nom : 皇 越舆 地志 ; anglais : Géographie de l’Empire Viet), de 1876 Việt Su thông Giam Cương MUC Khao Luoc (Han-Nom : 越 史 通鉴 纲目 考 略 ; anglais : Aperçu des Chroniques d’histoire du Viet) ont toute description similaire pour l’ Iles Paracel.

Figure 8. L’image numérisée de la pétition que le ministère des Travaux publics soumis à l’empereur Thieu Tri en 1847 avec la note approbation de l’Empereur mis en évidence dans le cercle rouge.

En raison de la richesse précitée de produits de la mer et des biens de navires naufragés dans le Paracel et Spratly l’, les dynasties féodales vietnamiennes ont longtemps exploité la souveraineté sur les îles. Beaucoup d’histoire et de géographie livres anciens du Viet Nam fournissent des preuves de l’organisation et du fonctionnement du Hoàng Sa flottilles, qui a effectué ces tâches d’exploitation.

Réussir les seigneurs Nguyen à gouverner le pays, la dynastie des Tay toujours accordé une attention juste à maintenir et à déployer Hoang Sa flottilles même si elle a dû faire face en permanence avec les invasions de la dynastie Qing et Siam de la Chine. Sous la dynastie des Tay Son, la cour impériale a poursuivi l’organisation de différentes formes d’exploitation des îles Paracel avec la conscience qu’il exerçait la souveraineté sur les îles.

Depuis la fondation de la dynastie des Nguyen en 1802 jusqu’à ce que le traité de 1884 de Hue avec la France, les empereurs Nguyen avaient fait tous les efforts pour consolider la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et les îles Spratly.

Hoàng Sa flottille, plus tard renforcée par BAC Hải flottille, a été maintenu et actif en permanence sous les seigneurs Nguyen (1558-1783) de la dynastie des Tay Son (1786-1802) et de la dynastie des Nguyen (1802-1945).

En conclusion, l’histoire ancienne et les livres de géographie du Viet Nam ainsi que les preuves trouvées dans les documents écrits par plusieurs navigateurs et les membres du clergé pointent tous vers le fait que les dynasties successives au Viet Nam ont été les souverains de la Paracel et les îles Spratly depuis des siècles occidentaux. Présence régulière du vietnamien États-fondé Hoàng Sa flottille de cinq à six mois annuellement à exercer certaines fonctions dans ces îles est en soi une preuve incisive démontrant l’exercice de la souveraineté vietnamienne. L’acquisition et l’exploitation par des Etats souverains vietnamiens de ces îles n’ont jamais été contestées par d’autres pays, d’autres révèlent que le Paracel et les îles Spratly ont longtemps fait partie du territoire du Viet Nam.

Souveraineté exercer sur le Paracel et les îles Spratly Remplacé par la France au nom du Viet Nam
Depuis la conclusion du traité de Hué, le 6 Juin 1884, la France a représenté le Viet Nam dans toutes ses relations extérieures et de la protection de la souveraineté du Viet Nam et l’intégrité territoriale. Dans le cadre de ces engagements, la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et les îles Spratly a été exercée par la France. Que l’exercice de la souveraineté est clairement illustré par de nombreux exemples dont certains sont énumérés ci-dessous.

Les navires de guerre français patrouillent souvent dans la mer de Chine méridionale, dénommée « Bien Djong" (en anglais : La Mer de l’Est) en vietnamien, notamment dans les domaines de la Paracel et les îles Spratly.

En 1899, Paul Doumer, alors gouverneur général de l’Indochine, a envoyé une proposition à Paris pour la construction d’un phare sur l’île Pattle (Đảo Hoang Sa) dans les îles Paracel pour guider les navires dans la région. Le plan a toutefois été abandonné en raison de problème de budget.

Depuis 1920, indochinois navires de la douane avaient intensifié leurs patrouilles dans la zone des îles Paracel pour empêcher la contrebande.

En 1925, l’Institut océanographique de Nha Trang a envoyé le navire De Lanessan pour une étude océanographique dans les îles Paracel. En plus de A. Krempf, directeur de l’Institut puis, et d’autres chercheurs, dont Delacour et Jabouille également rejoint le voyage pour leur recherche géologique et biologique et d’autres études. Toujours en 1925, le ministre des Affaires militaires (Han-Nom : 兵部尚书) que Trong teinte de la Cour Impériale a réaffirmé que les îles Paracel sont sur le territoire du Viet Nam.

En 1927, le navire De Lanessan est allé aux îles Paracel pour une étude scientifique.
En 1929, la délégation Pierre de Rouville a proposé que quatre phares à mettre en place aux quatre coins des îles Paracel, à savoir Triton (Tri Ton) et Lincoln (Linh CON) Îles et le Nord (Dja BAC) et Bombay Reefs (BAI Bông Bay).
En 1930, la canonnière La Malicieuse allé aux îles Paracel.
En Mars 1931, le navire Inconstant est allé aux îles Paracel.
En Juin 1931, le navire De Lanessan est allé aux îles Paracel.
En mai 1932, le cuirassé Alerte allé aux îles Paracel.
Du 13 Avril 1930 au 12th Avril 1933, le gouvernement de la France a déployé des unités navales en garnison dans les grandes îles de la îles Spratly, à savoir Spratly (Truong Sa Lon), Amboine Cay (An Bang), Itu Aba (Ba Bình) , Groupe des Deux Iles (Song Tu) [23], Loaita (Loai Ta), et Thitu (Thi Tu).
Le 21 Décembre 1933, alors gouverneur de la Cochinchine (string đốc Nam Ky) MJ Krautheimer a signé le décret d’annexion des îles Spratly d’, Amboine Cay, Itu Aba, Song TU Group, Loaita et Thitu à la province de Ba Ria [ 24].
En 1937, les autorités françaises ont transmis un ingénieur civil nommé Gauthier aux îles Paracel d’examiner les positions des phares de construction et un terminal d’hydravion.
En Février 1937, le navire de patrouille Lamotte Piquet commandée par le contre-amiral Istava est venu aux îles Paracel.

Figure 9. L’image numérisée du décret no. 4702-CP de Décembre 21st, 1933 publié par le gouverneur de la Cochinchine.

Le 29 Mars 1938, l’empereur Bao Đại signé l’édit impérial de diviser les îles Paracel de la province de Nam Nghia et les annexer à la province de Thua Thien [25]. L’édit est ainsi libellé :
« Considérez que les îles Sa Hoàng (Archipel des Iles Paracels) ont été pendant longtemps sous la souveraineté de nuoc nam [12], et directement sous la province de Nam Nghia pendant le temps des dynasties précédentes, et que cette administration n’avait pas été changé jusqu’à ce que le règne de l’Cao Hoàng Dje [26] que toutes les communications avec ces îles ont été réalisées via les ports maritimes de la province de Nam Nghia ;
Considèrent que le progrès nautique, les communications ont changé, et que le représentant de la cour impériale qui est allé sur une tournée d’inspection et le représentant du protectorat pétition à l’annexe les îles de la province de Thua Thien pour des raisons de commodité ;
Ordre :
Un seul article - d’annexer les îles Sa Hoàng (Archipel des Iles Paracels) à la province de Thua Thien. En termes d’administration, ces îles sont sous le commandement du gouverneur de la province ».

Figure 10. L’image numérisée de l’édit impérial signé par l’empereur Bao Đại le 29 Mars 1938.

Le 15 Juin 1938, le Gouverneur général de l’Indochine Jules Brévié a signé le décret portant création d’une unité administrative dans les îles Paracel dans la province de Thua Thien.
En 1938, la France a érigé une stèle de la souveraineté, a complété les constructions d’un phare, une station météorologique, un poste de radio de l’Ile Pattle (vietnamien : Đảo Hoàng Sa ; français : Île Pattle), et une station météorologique et une station de radio sur Itu Île Aba dans les îles Paracel. L’inscription sur la stèle indique : "La République française, le Royaume d’An Nam, les îles Paracel, 1816 - Île Pattle - 1938 » (1816 et 1938 sont les années de l’exercice de la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur les îles Paracel par l’empereur Gia Long, et de l’érection français de la stèle, respectivement).

Figure 11. La stèle de la souveraineté érigé par la France en 1938.

Le 5 mai 1939, le gouverneur général de l’Indochine Jules Brévié a signé un décret portant modification du décret du 15 Juin 1938. Le nouveau décret a créé deux délégations administratives, à savoir les délégations des croissants et ses dépendants, et Amphirite et ses personnes à charge.

Pendant toute la durée du représentant du Viet Nam pour ses relations extérieures, France cessé d’affirmer la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et les îles Spratly, et a protesté ces actions qui ont gravement violé cette souveraineté. Par exemple, le 4 Décembre, 1931 et 24th Avril 1932, France s’oppose le gouvernement de la Chine sur l’intention du Guangdong (Han-Nom : 广东) les autorités provinciales à un appel d’offres pour l’exploitation du guano sur les îles Paracel. D’autres exemples incluent l’annonce de la France le 24 Juillet, 1933 à Japon que ses forces armées campaient sur les grandes îles dans les îles Spratly, et l’objection de la France le 4 Avril 1939 au l’inclusion de certaines îles situées dans les îles Spratly le Japon au titre de sa compétence .

Figure 12. L’image numérisée du décret du 5 mai 1939 émis par le gouverneur général Jules Brévié.

Protection et l’exercice de la souveraineté du Viet Nam au cours des Paracel et les îles Spratly depuis la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale
Après son retour en Indochine après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, au début de 1947, la France a demandé à la République de Chine à retirer leurs troupes de certaines îles au sein de la Paracel et les îles Spratly qui avaient été illégalement occupés à la fin de 1946. Les forces armées françaises alors arrivés sur les îles pour remplacer ceux de la Chine et de reconstruire leur météorologiques et les stations de radio.

Figure 13. Les images numérisées des documents de l’Organisation mondiale météorologiques contenant des informations sur les stations météorologiques du Viet Nam dans les îles Sprartly (Itu Aba sur) (à gauche) et les îles Paracel (à droite) en 1949 et 1973, respectivement.

Le 7 Septembre 1951, Tran Van Huu la tête de l’Etat de la délégation du Viet Nam à la Conférence de San Francisco sur le traité de paix avec le Japon, a déclaré que les Paracel et les îles Spratly ont longtemps été des territoires du Viet Nam, et que « pour profiter pleinement de toutes les chances pour éviter toute semence de litige dans l’avenir, nous affirmons notre souveraineté de longue date sur le Paracel et Spratly la Islands". Cette déclaration ne répond pas à toutes les objections et / ou de réserves d’opinion.

En 1953, le navire français Ingénieur en chef Girod a poursuivi son voyage d’étude sur l’océanographie, la géologie, la géographie et l’écologie dans les îles Paracel.

Gouvernements ultérieurs au Sud Viet Nam, y compris les deux Gon administration SAI (la République du Viet Nam), et le Gouvernement révolutionnaire provisoire de la République du Sud Viet Nam (en abrégé gouvernement RSVN), a exercé la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et Spratly Îles comme clairement montré par les exemples suivants.

En 1956, les forces navales de l’administration Sài Gòn ont repris l’Paracel et les îles Spratly, lorsque la France a retiré ses troupes. Dans la même année, avec l’aide des forces navales de la Saigon administration, le ministère des Mines, de la technologie et des petites industries (SO HAM Mo, Công Nghe & Tieu Công nghiep) a organisé une enquête sur quatre îles dans les îles Paracel, à savoir Pattle (Hoang Sa), Argent (Quang Ảnh), Robert (Hữu Nhat), et Drumond (Duy Mong).

Figure 14. L’image numérisée de la déclaration de Tran Van Huu chef de l’Etat de la délégation du Viet Nam à la Conférence de San Francisco 1951 sur le traité de paix avec le Japon.

Le 22 Octobre 1956, le GON administration Sài placé les îles Spratly dans la province du Tuy Phước.

Le 13 Juillet 1961, le GON administration Sài transféré la compétence des îles Paracel de la province de Thua Thien à la province de Quang Nam. La commune administrative de Định Hai, dirigée par un envoyé administrative directement sous le district de Hoa Vang, a été établi dans les îles.

Figure 15. L’image numérisée du décret 174-NV du Président de la République du Viet Nam sur le transfert de la compétence des îles Paracel de Thua Thien Quang Nam au Provinces.

De 1961 à 1963, le GON administration Sài construit stèles de souveraineté sur les îles principales dans les îles Spratly comme Spratly, Itu Aba, et le Cay Sud-Ouest.

Figure 16. La stèle de la souveraineté érigé par la République du Viet Nam sur l’île Spratly en 1961.

Le 21 Octobre 1969, le GON administration Sài annexé Định Hải commune dans Hòa Longue commune, y compris sous Hòa Vang district de la province de Quang Nam.

En Juillet 1973, l’Institut de recherche agricole (Vien Khao Cuu Nông nghiep) du Ministère du Développement et de terres agricoles (BO Phát Trien Nông nghiep & Djien DJIA) a mené son enquête sur l’île Namyit (Nam Nam Ai ou encore) dans le Spratly Îles.

En Août 1973, le Ministère de la Planification nationale et du Développement (BO KE Hoach & Phát Trien Quốc gia), en collaboration avec Marubeni Corporation du Japon le Gon administration Sai, a mené une enquête sur les phosphates dans les îles Paracel.

Le 6 Septembre 1973, le GON administration Sài annexé les îles de Spratly, Itu Aba, Loaita, Thitu, Namyit, Sin Cole (Sinh Ton), le Nord-Est et Sud-Ouest Cays et les autres îles adjacentes dans Phước Hải commune, Đất Djo District , province de Phuoc Tuy [27].

Figure 17. L’image numérisée du décret 420-BNV/HCĐP/26 du ministère de l’Intérieur
de la République du Viet Nam sur l’annexion des îles Spratly dans la province du Tuy Phước.

Pleinement conscient de la souveraineté de longue date du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et les îles Spratly, les gouvernements du Sud Viet Nam ont montré tous les efforts pour protéger la souveraineté contre toute violation et / ou litiges sur les deux archipels.

Le 16 Juin 1956, le ministère des Affaires étrangères de la Gon administration Sài a publié une déclaration pour réaffirmer la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur les îles Spratly. Dans la même année, le GON administration Sài fermement opposé à l’occupation des îles de l’Est dans les îles Paracel par la République populaire de Chine.

Le 22 Février 1959, l’Administration Sai Gon détenu pendant un certain temps 82 personnes qui prétendaient être des « pêcheurs » de la République populaire de Chine et avaient débarqué sur les îles de Robert Drummond, et Duncan (Quang Hoà) dans les îles Paracel .

Le 20 Avril 1971, le GON administration Sài une fois de plus réaffirmé que les îles Spratly sont les territoires du Viet Nam. Cette affirmation de la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur les îles a été réitérée par le ministre des Affaires étrangères de la Saigon administration dans le 13ème Juillet, 1971 conférence de presse.

Le 19 Janvier 1974, les forces militaires de la République populaire de Chine ont occupé les îles du sud-ouest des îles Paracel, cette violation de l’intégrité territoriale du Viet Nam a été condamné le même jour par le GON administration ISC. Le gouvernement RSVN déclaré sa position en trois points sur la solution des litiges territoriaux, le 26 Janvier 1974, et réaffirmé la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et Spratly le le 14 Février, 1974.

Le 28 Juin 1974, le gouvernement RSVN revendiqué sa souveraineté sur les Paracels et les îles Spratly à la troisième loi de conférence de la mer à Caracas, au Venezuela. Le 5 et 6 mai 1975, le gouvernement a annoncé son RSVN libération des îles Spratly, qui avait été sous le contrôle de l’administration Gòn ISC.

En Septembre 1975, le délégation du gouvernement RSVN à la Conférence météorologique Colombo a déclaré que les îles Paracel sont les territoires du Viet Nam, et a demandé que la station météorologique du Viet Nam dans les îles à être inscrit sur la liste des stations météorologiques (cette station avait l’OMM déjà été inscrite dans la liste de l’OMM sous le numéro d’enregistrement 48.860).

Après la réunification du pays, l’État de la République socialiste du Viet Nam a été promulgue nombreux documents juridiques essentiels sur la mer et les Paracels et les îles Spratly. Il s’agit notamment : de 1977 Déclaration du gouvernement de la République socialiste du Viet Nam sur les eaux du Viet Nam territoriales, des zones contiguës, des zones économiques exclusives et plateau continental ; la Déclaration 1982 par le Gouvernement de la République socialiste du Viet Nam sur la ligne de base Utilisé dans le calcul de la superficie des eaux territoriales du Viet Nam, la Constitution de 1992 de la République socialiste du Viet Nam, la résolution de la cinquième session de l’Assemblée nationale Neuvième de la République socialiste du Viet Nam sur la ratification de la Convention des Nations Unies de 1982 1994 sur le droit de la mer (UNCLOS) et la loi des frontières nationales 2003.

En termes d’administration, le gouvernement du Viet Nam a fait le Spratly et les îles Paracel districts (Huyen) sous Đồng Nai et Quang Nam-Đà Nang provinces, respectivement. Après quelques révisions administratives, les îles Paracel sont actuellement sous la ville de Đà Nang, tandis que les îles Spratly appartiennent à Khanh Hoa Province.

Le Gouvernement de la République socialiste du Viet Nam a affirmé à maintes reprises la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et les îles Spratly dans des notes diplomatiques adressées aux parties concernées, dans les comptes du ministère des Affaires étrangères, et dans les réunions internationales, y compris la réunion OMM Genève (Juin 1980) et au Congrès géologique international à Paris (Juillet 1980).

Le Viet Nam a à plusieurs reprises émis ses papiers blancs (en 1979, 1981 et 1988) sur la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et Spratly l’d’affirmer que ces deux archipels sont des territoires inséparables du Viet Nam, et que le Viet Nam a la pleine souveraineté sur les conformément aux lois et pratiques internationales.

Le 14 Mars 1988, le ministère des Affaires étrangères de la République socialiste du Viet Nam a publié une déclaration condamnant l’acte de la Chine qui a provoqué un conflit militaire et la saisie de certains îlots submergées du Viet Nam dans les îles Spratly.

En Avril 2007, le Gouvernement du Viet Nam a établi Truong Sa Township (ITH Xa), Song Tu Tây et Sinh Communes Ton (Xa) sous Truong Sa District (Huyen) dans les îles Spratly.

Conclusion
En résumé, il ya trois points majeurs, on peut clairement conclure avec des références aux documents historiques mentionnés ci-dessus ainsi que le droit et la pratique internationale.

Premières Etats souverains successifs, au Viet Nam ont réellement possédé le Paracel et les îles Spratly pour longtemps depuis le temps où il n’y avait pas de revendication de souveraineté sur ces archipels.

Deuxièmement, pour des centaines d’années depuis le 17ème siècle, le Viet Nam a en effet exercé sa souveraineté sur le Paracel et les îles Spratly d’une manière continue et paisible.

Et troisièmement, le Viet Nam a toujours été proactif dans la protection de ses droits et titres contre des intentions et des actions qui violent la souveraineté, l’intégrité territoriale et les droits du Viet Nam dans le Paracel et les îles Spratly.

ANNEXE
Certains documents internationaux et les traités relatifs à la souveraineté du Viet Nam au cours des Paracel et les îles Spratly

1. Le Communiqué du Caire le 27 Novembre, 1943
Lorsque la Seconde Guerre mondiale entrait dans sa phase féroce, une conférence des trois pouvoirs des Alliés, à savoir le Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et Irlande du Nord, les États-Unis d’Amérique et la République de Chine (représenté par Chiang Kai-shek), a été organisé au Caire, en Egypte. Le Communiqué du Caire [28], l’issue de la conférence, stipule que : « Les trois grands alliés se battent cette guerre pour empêcher et réprimer l’agression du Japon. Ils convoitent aucun gain pour eux-mêmes et n’ont pas de pensée de l’expansion territoriale. C’est leur but que le Japon doit être dépouillé de toutes les îles du Pacifique qu’elle a saisis ou occupé depuis le début de la première guerre mondiale en 1914, et que tous les territoires Japon a volés aux Chinois, tels que la Mandchourie, Formose et les Pescadores, doivent être restaurées à la République populaire de Chine ".
Conformément à cette déclaration, les trois grands alliés ont exprimé leur but de forcer le Japon à revenir à la République populaire de Chine ces territoires qui ont été saisis de la Chine, y compris la Mandchourie, Formose (Taiwan) et les Pescadores (Penghu), sans aucune mention de la Paracel et les îles Spratly.

2. Déclaration de Potsdam le 26 Juillet 1945
Les chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amérique, le Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et l’Irlande du Nord et la République de Chine a déclaré que les termes figurant dans le Communiqué du Caire 1943 doivent être exécutés [28]. Après avoir déclaré la guerre avec le Japon en Extrême-Orient, l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques a également rejoint cette Déclaration.
L’Accord de Potsdam affecté la Chine la responsabilité de désarmer les forces japonaises dans le nord de la latitude 16o au Viet Nam. En conséquence, à partir de la fin de 1946, les troupes de Tchang Kaï-chek sont entrés dans les provinces du nord et les îles Paracel du Viet Nam. Leurs activités de désarmement dans ces domaines ne signifient pas, dans tous les sens, l’affirmation et / ou la restauration de la souveraineté chinoise sur le Paracel et les îles Spratly.

3. Traité de paix avec le Japon en 1951
La Conférence de San Francisco sur le traité de paix avec le Japon a eu lieu à partir de Septembre 4th to 8th, 1951 la participation de 51 pays. L’article 2 du chapitre II du projet de traité stipule que le Japon renonce à tous les droits, titres et créances à des territoires spécifiques qui sont répertoriés. Ces territoires sont les suivants : la Corée, Formose (Taiwan), le Pescadores (Penghu), les îles Kouriles, la partie sud de l’île de Sakhaline, les îles du Pacifique, les régions antarctiques, les îles Spratly et Paracel les îles.
Lors de la session plénière le 5 Septembre 1951, la Conférence a accepté la décision du président de la Conférence de rejeter une autre proposition demandant "que le Japon reconnaît la pleine souveraineté de la République populaire de Chine sur la Mandchourie, Formose et les îles adjacentes, Penlinletao ( les Pescadores), les îles Tunshatsuntao (Pratas), le Sishatsuntao et Chunshatsuntao (les îles Paracel, les Amphirites, et les cayes submergées Maxfield), et le Nanshatsundao (y compris les îles Spratly), et que le Japon renonce à tous les droits, titres, et les revendications de ces territoires ». Cette décision de rejet a été approuvé par la Conférence avec 46 ayes, trois non et une abstention. Les pays qui ont voté pour rejeter cette proposition sont l’Argentine, Australie, Belgique, Bolivie, Brésil, Cambodge, Canada, Ceylan (Sri Lanka), Chili, Colombie, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominique, Équateur, Égypte, El Salvador, Éthiopie, France, Grèce, Guatemala, Haïti, Honduras, Indonésie, Iran, Iraq, Laos, Liban, Libéria, Luxembourg, Mexique, Pays-Bas, Nouvelle-Zélande, Nicaragua, Norvège, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Pérou, Philippines, Arabie Saoudite, Syrie, la Turquie, le Royaume-Uni, aux Etats-Unis, le Viet Nam et le Japon.
Dans le traité ratifié de paix avec le Japon, l’article 2 du chapitre II [29] reste inchangé car il avait d’abord été rédigé, qui stipule :
"(A) Le Japon, reconnaissant l’indépendance de la Corée, renonce à tous les droits, titres et revendications sur la Corée, y compris les îles de Quelpart, Port Hamilton et Dagelet.
(B) Le Japon renonce à tous les droits, titres et revendications sur Formose et les Pescadores.
(C) Le Japon renonce à tous les droits, titres et revendications sur les îles Kouriles, et à la partie de Sakhaline et les îles qui lui est adjacente sur laquelle le Japon a acquis la souveraineté comme une conséquence du traité de Portsmouth de Septembre 5th 1905.
(D) Le Japon renonce à tous les droits, titres et revendications dans le cadre de la Ligue du système de mandat des Nations, et accepte l’action du Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies Avril 2nd 1947, l’extension du système de tutelle des îles du Pacifique anciennement sous mandat du Japon .
(E) Le Japon renonce à toute revendication d’un droit ou d’un titre ou d’un intérêt dans le cadre d’une partie de la zone de l’Antarctique, que ce soit résultant de l’activité des ressortissants japonais ou autrement.
(F) Le Japon renonce à tous les droits, titres et revendications sur les îles Spratly et les îles Paracel ".
Apparemment, les territoires proclamés par le Caire Communiqué 1943 et le Traité de paix 1951 au Japon d’être sous la souveraineté de la Chine seulement inclure Taïwan et Penghu. Le fait que le traité de paix avec le Japon places Taiwan et Penghu ensemble dans un même article (point B), et le Paracel et les îles Spratly ensemble dans une rubrique distincte (article f) implique que les Paracel et les îles Spratly sont pas reconnus comme parties de la Chine.
Toujours à la Convention de 1951 Conférence de San Francisco, le 7 Septembre 1951, Tran Van Huu la tête de l’Etat de la délégation du Viet Nam, a déclaré que le Paracel et les îles Spratly ont longtemps été des territoires du Viet Nam, et que « prendre le meilleur parti de chaque occasion pour empêcher toute semence de litige dans l’avenir, nous affirmons notre souveraineté de longue date sur le Paracel et les îles Spratly ». Aucun des représentants des 51 pays participant à la Conférence contesté et / ou exprimé leur souhait de réserver opinions sur cette déclaration.

Tous ces documents et les preuves mentionnées ci-dessus montrent clairement que les documents juridiques internationaux, du Communiqué du Caire du 27 Novembre, 1943 (réaffirmé par la Déclaration de Potsdam du 26 Juillet, 1945) le traité de San Francisco de paix avec le Japon du 8 Septembre, 1951 ne reconnaît pas la souveraineté de tous les autres pays au cours de Paracel du Viet Nam et les îles Spratly. Aussi, le fait qu’aucun des pays participant à la Convention de 1951 Conférence de San Francisco s’est opposé à ou souhaité réserver leur opinion sur la déclaration de la délégation du Viet Nam sur la souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et Spratly montre que la communauté internationale a reconnu implicitement l’ souveraineté du Viet Nam sur la Paracel et les îles Spratly.
Google Traduction pour les entreprises :Google Translator ToolkitGadget TraductionOutil d’aide à l’export

Portfolio